League of Women Voters Of Adams County Colorado
League of Women VotersOfAdams County Colorado

   THE VOTER     

LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS OF ADAMS COUNTY

Meeting Location: Community Reach Center

11285 High Line Dr, Northglenn

 

Meetings are held from September thru May.  

On the second Monday of each month we have evening meetings in Room 201(Bob's Place) from 6:30pm to 8:00pm.  Arrive at 6:15 for coffee.

On the fourth Monday of each month we have morning meetings in Room 201 from 11:30am to 12:30pm. 

Board Meetings: The dates are noted on the calendar. Members are invited to attend.

www.lwvadamscounty.org 

   

  www.facebook.com/lwvadamscountyco/            

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League calendar:

 

November 12th @ 6:30 pm:  

Kipp Scott, Water Systems Manager for South Adams County Water and Sanitation District.  He will provide general information on surface water and groundwater supplies as well as information of the impacts of drilling oil and gas wells on drinking water aquifers.

 

November 19th: 

 Open to all members Please contact any board member for the monthly board meeting location and time.

 

November 26th @ 11:30 am: 

Dr.  Chris Fiedler, Superintendent Brighton School District, Adams County 27J.  Dr. Fiedler grew up in Iowa, moved to Colorado where he graduated from Greeley West High School and then from University of Northern Colorado.  He also holds a Masters Degree and a Doctorate.  He served as either a teacher, principal, counselor, or a supt. at Gilpin County, Limon, Deer Trail and ended up as principal of the new high school in Dist. 27J - Prairie View High School.  He will talk about the District, funding of education in Colorado (Amendment 73, if it passes) and the District's 4-day school week.

 

League Meetings:

 

Meetings are held from September through May.  All meetings are held at Community Reach Center, 11285 Highline Drive, Northglenn, CO  80233 in Room 201 (Bob’s Place).  On the second Monday of each month we have evening meetings from 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.  On the fourth Monday of each month we have morning meetings from 11:30 a.m. to 1:00 pm.  There are no December meetings.

 

board Meetings:

 

The dates for Board Meetings are on the calendar.  All members are welcome and invited to attend.

 

Please be alert to possible changes in meeting times or places and to special events.  Changes will appear on this calendar and/or on the website.  An attempt also will be made to contact all members 

 

DAYLIGHT SAVINGS TIME ENDS ON SUNDAY NOVEMBER 4TH

ADAMS COUNTY REGISTERED VOTERS

AS OF 10/01/18

  • DEM:  95,341
  • REP:  66,705
  • UNAFFILIATED:  115,243
  • OTHER:  5,008
  • TOTAL:  282,297

CHRISTMAS DINNER

By Pat Lewis


Our Christmas Dinner will be Monday December 10, 2018 at 6:30pm at Mickey’s Top Sirloin, 6950 North Broadway, Denver, CO 80221.  The cost will be $19.25 per person and this includes tax and tips.  Alcoholic drinks are on your own. 

 

We will have four choices for dinner and you will pick your entree that night.  All dinners include salad, bread, coffee, tea or soda. 

 

We will need your RSVP by December 3rd.

Please RSVP to Shirley Mrochek via email at kmro1@msn.com or call her at 303-452-0598. 

  
The entrees for dinner are your choice of:

  1. Breast of chicken – served with rice pilaf and vegetables.
  2. Pork Chops – served with mashed potatoes, gravy and vegetables.
  3. Mexican Entrees are:
  • Combination Plate – includes a bean burrito, cheese enchilada, beef taco and bean tostada.
  • Relleno Plate – includes two chili rellenos, Spanish rice, and refried beans.
  • Fajitas – choice of beef or chicken.
  • Enchilada Plate – includes three cheese enchiladas, Spanish rice and refried beans.
  1. Italian Entrees are:
  • Ravioli – served with meatballs.
  • Chicken Parmesan – served on top of spaghetti.
  • Chicken or Vegetable Alfredo.
  • Rigatoni – served with meatballs.
  • Spaghetti – served with meatballs.

Dessert will be provided by our League.

Again this year we will be donating gifts to the Community Reach Center. 

 

Evan Narotsky, Event and Outreach Specialist, sent me an email saying they are in special need of blankets and towels.  All donated items must be new and unwrapped.

Happy Holidays!!

 

MEMBERSHIP IS NOW DUE

By Shirley Mrochek, Treasurer

 

Local Leagues are required to submit a new membership roster to State for all current members.  Therefore, we need members to pay their dues and renew their membership as soon as possible.  You may send your check to me or bring it to the next meeting.

Basic membership is $60.00.  Thanks very much for your cooperation.

 

JOIN A CITIZEN ADVISORY BOARD OR COMMISSION

 

 

Calling all Adams County residents. Make a difference by joining a board or commission.  There are 60 terms ending this year for a variety of boards. Application deadline is Friday, Nov. 2 - apply now for terms starting in January.

http://www.adcogov.org/citizen-advisory-boards-and-commissions

 

700-plus acres in Thornton snatched up for $20M.

Here's what's planned for the land.

A 765-acre master planned community will be built near the E-470 and I-25 Interchange North in Thornton.

Article by Kelcey McClung – Reporter

Denver Business Journal

Oct 16, 2018

 

Hines and Trez Capital have acquired a 765-acre property in Thornton, with plans to develop a single-family home and mixed-use community.

According to public records, they acquired the land for a little over $20 million.

Known as Parterre, the master-planned community will be located between Holly and Quebec streets, near the $5 million Quebec Street interchange that opened in 2014.

Hines, the Houston-based international real estate firm, will oversee development of the project including the community master plan and infrastructure, neighborhoods and more.

"This property is a key land parcel in north metro Denver that has essentially become a near 800-acre infill site over the last five years," said Chad Murphy, Hines director. He added that the development would include a variety of housing options and prices.

According to John Hutchinson, president of Dallas-based Trez Capital, Parterre is the eleventh project that the partnership has purchased together.

William Lyon Homes and Lennar Homes will build homes on the site. Construction is expected to begin by late 2019.

Hines recently completed 1144 Fifteenth to downtown Denver, the 40-story office building that is home to Gates and Optiv, among others. It was also one of the developers on 1601 Wewatta and in 2015 sold its flex office portfolio for $78.5 million.

Ballot Issues Meeting

on October 8th

 

By Marge Innes, Voter Service

 

At the evening meeting on Oct. 8 Marge Innes, assisted by Jean Fredlund, presented our biennial ballot issue discussion.  This year we have 13 issues on the statewide ballot - six referred by the legislature, and seven citizen initiatives put on the ballot by petition.  There are nine Constitutional amendments and four propositions to change the Colorado State Statutes.

 

Amendments Y and Z are two that the state LWV worked on for two years with many other people and involves redistricting for congressional districts (Y) and redistricting for state senate and state representative districts (Z).

 

Redistricting must be done every ten years after the census, so these two are important amendments and if voted down will have to be redone by 2021 in order to redraw lines for the 2022 election.  Jean sits on the state Board of LWVCO and has worked on these two amendments, so I let her talk about these two not only at this presentation but all of our  previous talks on ballot issues.  I did the other 11 on oil well setbacks, two propositions to help fund state transportation projects, limitation on payday loans, lowering the age requirement for serving in the Colorado General Assembly, prohibiting slavery and involuntary servitude, funding for public schools and a few others.  After my presentation (and Jean's), Jean then gave the Colorado LWV positions on those issues

on which we have a position.  We had a good turnout and had many good questions and discussion.

 

Meeting on October 22nd

 

By Marge Innes

 

On Monday October 22nd two members of the Anythink Library staff came to speak at our meeting.  They spoke about the bond issue on the Adams County ballot for the Anythink Libraries and about what they want to use additional funding for if the issue passes.  Mainly, they want to increase hours and services for the 7 or 8 libraries and bookmobile:  Wright Farms, Huron, Perlmack, Brighton, Commerce City, York Street, Skyview, and Bennett.  To increase services and hours they must have increased staff.  The two who came were  Pam Smith (head of the library system) and Stacie Ledden, her assistant.  They asked if we would endorse the ballot issue, and we agreed.

 

 

Commerce City faces prospect of nearly 200 new oil and gas wells

Courtesy of http://techgreeny.com/

 

As the vote nears on a statewide proposal mandating significantly bigger buffers around new oil and gas wells, Commerce City elected officials and residents face the prospect of a nearly 20-fold increase in the number of wells in the city.

 

Applications from a handful of companies propose a total of roughly 190 wells in the city and another 40 wells outside but near the city boundaries. The applications filed with the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission, the state regulatory body, propose drilling several wells from 10 separate “pads,” or sites in the city.

 

Most of the sites would be on the fast-growing north side, which is heavily residential. To the residents who oppose the drilling, that’s a big problem.

 

“Our fundamental belief is that industrial uses are not compatible with densely populated residential areas,” Susan Noble said during a Sept. 10 Commerce City Council study session.

 

Along with wells, the sites would contain other equipment, including oil and water tanks and equipment set up to capture emissions and separate the oil and gas from other liquids. Depending on the number of wells, a pad can cover several acres.

Wells will run horizontally under “our neighborhoods, under our homes and schools,” said Noble, who formed the group North Range Concerned Citizens in the spring.

 

Councilman Steve Douglas agrees that intense oil and gas drilling doesn’t belong in the quickly growing neighborhoods, which include a new recreation center and parks.

“This north area has grown so much,” Douglas said. “Our growth rate right now is two families of four moving in every day. That’s significant.”

 

Douglas and Noble both support Commerce City and other communities that don’t want drilling in neighborhoods and other parts of their cities to strike a unified front against the development.

 

“If that means they have to sue, it means they have to sue,” Noble said. “If it means building a broad coalition to pressure on the state, they should do it.”

 

Commerce City Mayor Sean Ford said he understands people’s frustration, but stressed that the state, not cities, has the ultimate authority on oil and gas drilling permits. All the city can do is work with the companies to minimize the impacts, he said.

“We’re doing what we can to move the potential drilling as far away as we can from residences,” Ford said. “All of us on the city council live in the city. We don’t want the wells any closer to any of the residences any more than we want them near our own homes.”

Amanda Boldenow is among those who wants the city to keep drilling out of the city. She and her husband moved into the north part of Commerce City after having their house built in 2015. She said her in-laws moved from Seattle to be with them and their toddler and are upset about the proposed drilling.

 

“We’ll be totally surrounded if all of these go in,” Boldenow said.

 

There are only 12 active wells in the city now. Another 46 wells have been plugged and abandoned.

 

Although council members and residents have expressed some of the same concerns as proponents of Proposition 112, which would require that new oil and gas wells be at least 2,500 feet from homes and schools, Noble said she wasn’t aware of the ballot proposal when she first learned about the proposed drilling. She now supports the measure, which, if approved, would block most of the new wells in Commerce City, according to a map by the oil and gas commission projecting the effects of the ballot proposal.

 

The current requirement for setbacks is that new oil and gas wells be drilled at least 500 feet from homes and 1,000 feet from schools. As drilling has increased in more populated areas in the Denver metro area and farther north, complaints about noise and traffic and concerns about health and safety have shot up.

 

Fears intensified after two men died in a home explosion in Firestone in 2017 when a flow line attached to an oil well 170 feet from the house was cut. Investigators say an odorless mix of propane and methane seeped into the house through drains and a sump pump and ignited.

Noble said she worries that companies are rushing to get their permits approved in case the citizen-initiated measure is approved Nov. 6.

 

In fact, the number of drilling permits in the pipeline is up dramatically from last year. As of Aug. 18, state regulators were considering 5,489 drilling permits, compared with 1,855 at the same point a year ago.

“With prices having rebounded from two years ago, the economics are good for oil and natural gas development in Colorado. That, plus the fact that Proposition 112 is an attempt to ban our businesses, is pushing permitting application levels,” said Dan Haley, president and CEO of the Colorado Oil and Gas Association, a trade organization.

 

However, Extraction Oil and Gas, which has submitted applications for about half the wells being proposed in Commerce City, has put a hold on its permits as a good-faith measure while it continues discussions with the city, company spokesman Brian Cain said in a statement Thursday.  “Extraction is known for working collaboratively with the communities where we live and operate, and the oil and gas industry has a huge number of employees who are proud to call Commerce City home,” Cain said.

 

FREE Adams County Water Well Sampling Program

Adams County is offering a free well testing program for residents who meet these two eligibility requirements:

 

1) The well must be located west of Imboden Road in unincorporated Adams County.

 

2) The well must be located within one-half mile from an existing oil and gas well.

 

In addition, the Consent Form at https://www.tchd.org/DocumentCenter/View/4972/Consent-to-Well-Sampling---Adams-County---Version-1?bidId=

must be completed and submitted to ehwatersampling@tchd.org.

 

If you are interested in having your well tested through this free program, please contact us at 720-200-1583 or ehwatersampling@tchd.org

 

A push to inform Denver inmates of their voting rights is changing attitudes and boosting civic engagement

Courtesy of Allan Tellis

https://denverite.com/2018/10/12/a-push-to-inform-denver-inmates-of-their-voting-rights-is-changing-attitudes-and-boosting-civic-engagement/

 

“I feel like I never acknowledge a political stance because I didn’t have a chance to vote. It makes me think I have a voice.”

 

Antoine Calvin-Spencer said he didn’t think he had the right to vote and had held that belief for well over a decade.

He said that up until recently, he had paid no attention to politics because he believed had no say in any of it. But he just learned that he was wrong, and now that he is aware of his enfranchised status, he plans on giving himself a crash course on the political issues facing Colorado while he’s behind bars.

Almost everyone in Colorado has the ability vote. For the last two election cycles, Juston Cooper, deputy director of the Colorado Criminal Justice Reform Coalition (CCJRC), has partnered with the Denver Elections Division and the Sheriff’s department to get inside jails like the Denver Downtown Detention Center to tell inmates they are included in the voting process and remind them that they are most likely enfranchised in the state of Colorado.

These particular efforts are a part of the organization’s larger platform, Voting with Conviction, which is also an effort to educate the more than 125,000 people in the state of Colorado with a criminal record about their voting eligibility.

According to Cooper, they have registered just over 300 voters so far and have seen a significant turnout from their efforts. He said upwards of 25 percent of those that registered through the program went on to turn in their ballots, which is very similar to the general Denver population turnout, right around 33 percent.

On Thursday, the Sheriff’s Department allowed media members to accompany Cooper as he delivered information to inmates regarding voting and guided them through the process of getting themselves registered.

As Cooper went from to pod to pod in the jail, he emphasized the high likelihood that the inmates were eligible, as well as the importance of this year’s election in particular. He rattled off the various races on the ballot this year, — for attorney general, governor, state representative. However, the item that got the most focused attention of the crowd were the items involving judges up for retention.

Knowing that they can have such an immediate impact on issues that face them has empowered many of the inmates to become more civically engaged while behind bars and in the future once they are released.

The man sitting next to us as we had this conversation, Dennis Kenitzer, also an inmate, was aware of his right to vote but said he was planning on upgrading his political acumen to be an informed voter now that he’s registered.

Carrie Stanley, the director of inmate programs, noted that the inmates have access to whatever newspaper subscription they would like as well as a library and news-focused television.

The belief that Spencer expressed about people with records not being able to vote is far more common than Cooper would like it to be. In a survey conducted by the CCJRC, 64 percent of people who identified as neither white nor Hispanic also didn’t know those who were currently or had been behind bars were enfranchised.

Although inmates are eligible to vote, before Cooper got deeper into this work there were not as many structural mechanisms to make the process efficient. They are currently working on passing legislation that mandates the jails account for the processes of making inmates aware of their right to vote and the steps for registering.

The voting process for inmates, at least in the Downtown Detention Center, works very similarly to voting process outside of the jail. Inmates will put the jail address as their mailing address and receive and submit their ballots there.

Stanley noted that they have taken extra steps to make sure the jail’s mail room handles these documents in the most efficient fashion. They will take careful steps to make sure that inmates’ ballots are received at the proper times and explain the process for voting if they are released in between the time they receive the ballot and the time to submit it.

Antoine Grimes, a 25-year-old inmate who was born in raised in Denver, says he always was aware he had the right to vote and being incarcerated has given him an increased sense of civic engagement. He believes this type of engagement amongst his peers can have an impact if inmates are able to consolidate their voice as a voting bloc.  He feels that “the future is now” and his participation in civic duties will allow his age bracket to set up future generations for success.

Orlando Lujan, who said he’s been incarcerated for most of his life and comes from the Elyria-Swansea neighborhood, noted that being in jail for so long has given him what he calls a social disability. He described how his past makes it difficult for him to participate in typical social functions like finding housing, getting a job and handling finances. He says his life incarceration has been no life at all, but rather just an existence.

He’s glad Colorado enfranchised most of its residents and believes that other states and cities should follow suit. Increased civic engagement in neighborhoods like his can help others, especially young people, from falling into the depths of the criminal justice system, he said.
 

NOVEMBER 11TH IS VETERANS DAY

 

NOVEMBER 22ND IS

THANKSGIVING DAY

 

Submit any questions, comments, concerns, program ideas or requests to Marge Innes.  They are always welcome.
 

Submit any articles, announcements, or recommendations for Voter articles to the Voter Editor.  There are no June, July, or August Voters.

 

Help keep our Facebook page as active and informative as possible.  Email Laura Harris at lauraharris@outlook.com with any information you think should be on our Facebook page and it will be reviewed for relevance and accuracy.  Thanks for participating.

 

Marge Innes 1st Vice President

Acting Secretary/Voter Service

T303-427-3235

margeandsteve@msn.com

 

Pat Lewis 2nd Vice President

Membership

303-452-3030

pcmc1943@msn.com

 

Shirley Mrochek – Treasurer

303-452-0598

kmro1@msn.com

 

Cathy O’Grady-Melvin

Public Relations and Health Care Issues 303-451-0375

cathyogrady13@gmail.com

 

Judy Nicholaisen

303-469-4002

judynich05@aol.com

 

Lisa Forbes

Director at Large and Voter Editor

720-282-9449

info@lisaforbesinc.com

 

For information about League or directions to a meeting:

Please contact any board member.

www.facebook.com/lwvadamscountyco/

Like our page and keep up with League news, events, legislative actions, and helpful resources.

If you need a ride to a meeting, just ask!

Serving in Off-Board Positions:

Laura Harris Social Media Manager

Michele Kelley Website Manager

Peggy Gonder Membership & Leadership Development and LWV-Adams County Public Relations Specialist

 

Hospitality Team

Pat Lewis and Shirley Mrochek

 

OCTOBER 2018 NEWSLETTER

 

Community Reach Center, 11285 Highline Drive, Northglenn, CO 80233 LEAGUE CALENDAR: October 8th @ 6:00 pm: Ballot Issues – presented by Marge Innes and Jean Fredlund. There will be a PowerPoint presentation and time for questions. Ballot issue pamphlets will be available. PLEASE NOTE THAT THE BALLOT ISSUES MEETING BEGINS AT 6:00, NOT 6:30.

 

October 15th Board Meeting: Open to all members. Please contact any board member for the monthly board meeting location and time.

 

October 22nd @ 6:30 pm: TO BE DETERMINED. PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS WILL ALSO BE AN EVENING MEETING.

 

 LEAGUE MEETINGS:

Meetings are held from September through May. All meetings are held at Community Reach Center, 11285 Highline Drive, Northglenn, CO 80233. Meetings are held in Room 201 (Bob’s Place). On the second Monday of each month we have evening meetings from 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. On the fourth Monday of each month we have morning meetings from 11:30 a.m. to 1:00 pm. There are no December meetings.

 

BOARD MEETINGS:

The dates for Board Meetings are on the calendar. Members are welcome and invited to attend.

 

PLEASE BE ALERT to possible changes in meeting times or places and to special events. Changes will appear on this calendar and/or on the website. An attempt also will be made to contact all members.

 

Amendments Y and Z By Shirley Mrochek As you know we are supporting this Congressional and Legislative Redistricting Amendment.    I have yard signs that say YES on Y and Z. Please let me know if you could put a sign in your yard. I will bring it to you. I have several and would like to see them in yards, not my garage. Thanks.

 

It is time to renew your membership. By Shirley Mrochek Please pay your dues as soon as possible. You may send your check to me or bring it to the next meeting. Basic membership is $60.00. Go the  Membership on this website for more information.Thanks.

 

November 6th is Election Day. By Marge Innes So far, I have 3 ballot issue talks scheduled in addition to the October 8 LWV Meeting at Community Reach:

1. October 4 at 6:30 pm – Ballot Talk at Ad-Dems at the Pipefitters Hall, 6350 N. Broadway, Denver. Jean Fredlund will assist me.

2. We are speaking to a Transition Class of 18 to 21 year old students with disabilities at Ranum Middle School on Monday, October 8 at 9:15 am. This is a Voter Registration and Citizenship meeting as well as ballot information. These students need encouragement in becoming citizens. Jean Fredlund will be there as well as Kaaren Hardy who will be available for voter registration.

3. October 10 at 6:30 pm – Holiday Hills Mobile Home Park in Federal Heights.

 

VOTE411.org Update – LWVUS Vote 411  by Marge Innes Megan Brown, a very young, bright, vivacious person, mother of two toddlers (which made me admire her more) talked quite at length about VOTE411.org. She is the national Chairman of this program which is familiar to us on a local level. It is, essentially, a voter’s guide, a one-stop-shop for election information. It is nation-wide, state-wide, and local. It is specifically for you because you put in your address, so the information you receive is specifically for you. VOTE411.org has been used 1.6 million times nationwide this year - more than the uses in 2016, a presidential election year. It has made LWV the premier organization for voter education. Candidates want to participate, because they see that it is being used by voters. It is a trusted source. It has: nationwide candidate info, polling place locations, online voter registration, ID requirements, absentee ballot info, ballot measure info, early voting options, and election dates. TRY IT!

 

Adams County Candidate Meeting By Marge Innes   On September 13 at Community Reach Center we had an Adams County Candidate meeting.  We invited 33 candidates and 23 attended. Around 70 people in all attended. Getting hold of candidates these days is getting more difficult. At least two e-mails were sent out to each candidate, as well as phone calls. Very few responded until close to the end. I would be glad to talk to anyone in respect to communication for our next Candidate gathering. The microphones worked, but not well. So most candidates tried to speak loudly. No one complained about not hearing, but we need to work on this problem. Candidates were given 5 minutes to talk. We should have had a timekeeper (Marge tried to do it!) because at the end, around 8:00, we still had not had "mingling" time as promised. So Cathy and Marge went to the front desk. The receptionist told us to wind up and try to be out by 8:30 which we did. There was a little time to walk and talk. No one seemed terribly upset, except Ken Musso, candidate for assessor, who was mentioned by his opponent, Patsy Melonakis, in a somewhat derogatory way. Ken wanted additional time to rebut, but Marge said there was just no time. This incident received attention by the Westminster Window/Sentinel in their article about the meeting in the Sept. 20th edition. All in all, the Board deemed the meeting and the format successful. If anyone has any comments, those would be welcome.

 

National Voter Registration Day on September 25th By Shirley Mrochek  The following are a few of those who took part in National Registration Day 2018: Celebrities Melissa Etheridge, Rosario Dawson, Panic at the Disco, Jack Johnson, Will Farrell and Billy Eichner, Indigo Girls, Grizzly Bear, Leonardo DiCaprio, Conan O'Brien, Sarah Jessica Parker and George RR Martin, Regina Spektor, LeAnn Rimes, Dave Matthews Band, The Decemberists, Paul Scheer, Big Freedia, Sheryl Crow Media Companies Google, Twitter, Facebook, Youtube, MTV, HBO, Tumblr, Reddit, Pandora, Univision, BET, Snap!, AOL News Outlets TIME, The View, Billboard, USA Today, Fox News, Good Morning America, ABC News, CNN, Forbes, The Hill, Fortune, VICE, Quartz, Bleacher Report.

 

We held two Voter Registration Drives – one at College Hill Library and the other at Irving Street Library. We had five new registrations. Several people checked their registration and some made address changes. We answered lots and lots of questions about the election.  A big thank you to our volunteers Marge Innes, Kaaren Hardy, Michele Kelley, Cassie Costlow and Jill Munroe.

 

Making Democracy Work 2018 Conference on September 30th By Cathy O’Grady-Melvin Regan Byrd, keynote speaker at the conference, discussed Excelling at Equality and Allyship: a Model for Success. Her presentation was based on the premise that all oppression is connected. The topic is pertinent to what is happening in American politics at the moment. Oppression has four components: 1. ideological, 2. institutional, 3. interpersonal, and 4. internalized. Allyship is a verb and means what actions do you do. It is a constant process and feedback is FUNDAMENTAL. The process is influenced by culture and family values. Equality deals with Color Blindness, Race Neutrality, and White Male Privilege. There are some in society who will ask if much has changed.

 

LWVCO supports Proposition 112 – Setback Requirements for Oil and Gas Development Support documented here: http://lwvcolorado.org/lwv/lwvco-positionson-issues WHY:  This proposal will establish a commonsense buffer zone between new oil and gas development and homes, schools, playgrounds and drinking water sources. The distance of 2,500 feet, almost 1⁄2 mile, aligns with evacuation zones used by first responders and a growing body of peer-reviewed studies that show an increased risk of negative health impacts within 1⁄2 mile, including elevated cancer risk, respiratory problems, birth defects and low birth weight.  This proposal will update Colorado’s regulations to address new technologies and the scale of current drilling to protect our health, safety and quality of life with the inevitable harms and associated with hydraulic fracturing near neighborhoods and our water. Source: http://lwvcolorado.org/lwv/wpcontent/uploads/2018/09/LWVCOAdvocacy-BI-2018.pdf

 

Federalist Society Candidates Debate Wednesday, October 3 at 6:30 p.m. Hyatt Regency, 650 15th St., Denver 80202

 

Colorado Industrial Areas Foundation Candidates Forum Thursday, October 4 at 7:00 p.m. Our Lady Mother of the Church, Parish Hall 6690 E. 72nd Ave., Commerce City 80022

 

Submit any questions, comments, concerns, program ideas or requests to Marge Innes. They are always welcome.

 

Submit any written articles, requests, or recommendations for Voter articles to the Voter Editor.

 

Please help to keep our Facebook page as active and informative as possible. Send Laura Harris any information that you think should be on our Facebook Page and it will be reviewed for relevance and accuracy. Thanks for participating in keeping our Facebook page interesting.

 

If you need a ride to a meeting, just ask! Serving in Off-Board Positions: Laura Harris – Social Media Manager

Michele Kelley – Website Manager

Peggy Gonder – Membership & Leadership Development and LWV-Adams County Public Relations Specialist Hospitality Team

Pat Lewis and Shirley Mrochek Mission Statement

 

The League of Women Voters, a nonpartisan political organization, encourages informed and active participation in government and influences public policy through education and advocacy. Become a Member Dues are $60 per year, pro-rated after January 1st to September 15th.

This covers the cost of our local League’s pledge to the National LWVUS and its publication “The Voter” issued 4 times a year plus the state League and its publication “Colorado Voter” (published quarterly). The financial support of our local league activities, including the newsletter and other publications, registration for workshops and special projects, comes from member donations above the level of $60.00. We appreciate any donations in excess of the dues. Thank you for your consideration. Dues levels are as follows Basic Dues $60.00 Sustaining $75.00 Advocate $100.00 Checks may be made payable to LWV of Adams County and mailed to: SHIRLEY MROCHEK, TREASURER, 10781 WANDA LANE, NORTHGLENN, CO 80234

 

SEPTEMBER 2018  NEWSLETTER                              

Please be aware of possible changes in meeting times or places and special events. Changes will appear on this calendar and/or on the website. An attempt will be made to contact all members.

 

For information, directions or a ride:

Please call one of the Members of the Board of Directors

(See sidebar)

 

League Calendar

League calendar:

 

September 10 - No Meeting, come meet the candidates for Adams County elected offices.

 

September 13 - MEET THE CANDIDATES, see calendar for details.

 

September 17 - Board Meeting

 

September 24 - No Meeting. 

 

September  29 - Making Democracy Work - See calendar for details on this League of Women Voters statewide conference.

 

board Meetings:

 

The dates for Board Meetings are on the calendar.  Members are welcome and invited to attend.

Board meeting times can be changed to accommodate new members.

   HELP        

 

We need other members to step up and fill positions or be assistants on the Board so that those members who have been on the Board for many years can have the opportunity to step down. 

 

We need a Secretary.  We have not had one in a long time and Marge Innes has been filling multiple positions on the Board, including Acting Secretary.  

 

We need assistants in all positions, including voter registration and hospitality.

 

Please help our Adams County League to continue to function by relieving those Board members who have served for many consecutive years. Board meeting times can be changed to accommodate new members.

 

         

IMPORTANT INFORMATION

PUT THIS ON YOUR CALENDAR

 

Tuesday, May 29th: Last day to change affiliation or become unaffiliated to receive your desired primary ballot.


Monday, June 4th: First day you might receive your primary ballot in the mail.
Monday, June 18th: Last day to register to vote and still receive a primary ballot in the mail.


Tuesday, June 26th: Primary Election.


Monday, October 15th: First day you might receive your general election ballot in the mail.


Monday, October 29th: Last day to register to vote and still receive a general election ballot in the mail.


Tuesday, November 6th: General Election Day!

 

DID YOU KNOW?
People can register to vote or change their party affiliation at govotecolorado.com or by texting “CO” to “2Vote.
Coloradans can also register or change registration information by appearing in person at their county clerk’s offices, according to the Colorado Secretary of State’s Office

 

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LWV of Adams County is on Facebook!  Laura Harris is our new Facebook page manager (thank you, Laura!).  

 

Like our page and keep up with League news, events, legislative actions, and helpful resources. www.facebook.com/lwvadamscountyco/

 

Please help to keep our Facebook page as active and informative as possible.  Send Laura Harris any information that you think should be on our Facebook Page and it will be reviewed for relevance and accuracy.  Thanks for participating in keeping our Facebook page interesting.

 

 

 

 

APRIL 9TH ANNUAL MEETING

By Marge Innes

 On April 9, 2018, we had a really good 61st Annual Meeting!  We had 15 members and even had a new member that night - Maddie Scott - well above a quorum!  Still we missed all of you who did not attend.

 

Marge Innes presided over the meeting and Beth Vierra offered to take minutes (in the absence of a secretary).  Shirley Mrochek in her efficient way explained the 2018 budget and it passed.  We passed out copies of the newly improved by-laws.  There were no new program items brought to the floor.  However, we had no new board members nominated.  The current Board would love to have even some visitors to see how we do things and to see how we could be improved upon.  We loved having Laura (Laura Harris served on the Board for this past year and undertook Voter Registration and Facebook.  She will continue with Facebook.) and we love having Lisa, our tireless Voter Editor - What would we do without her! 

 

APRIL 28 NATURALIZATION CEREMONY & VOTER REGISTRATION DRIVE

By Marge Innes

 

LWVCO asked our League to conduct a voter registration drive for the naturalization ceremony which was held Saturday, April 28, 2018, hosted by the USCIS (U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services) at the Westminster Recreation Center at 104th Ave. and Sheridan Blvd.  So we made this our end of April regular meeting.  None of us had ever attended one of these ceremonies.  The ceremony was very stirring, patriotic, and emotional.  Forty two people became new citizens.  Twenty-one countries were represented - the most coming from Mexico.  We sang the national anthem, and then elected officials from the City of Westminster, Adams County, and the State of Colorado spoke and welcomed them.  There was a video from Pres. Trump also welcoming them.  Then they took their naturalization oath and we all recited the Pledge of Allegiance.  Then there was much applauding as they received their certificates of citizenship and had their pictures taken with their certificates.  Some elementary students from Westminster Public Schools sang, This Land Is Your Land.  Then we were mobbed with people who wanted to register to vote.  We had our table in the back of the room near the door, and clipboards and tables were crowded with people registering. 

 

We had 13 registrations filled out (three done on line), and more who just took our cards with voting information.  Those league members in attendance were Marge Innes, Kaaren Hardy, Kathleen Costlow, Michele Kelley, Margaret Cepeda, Beth Vierra, and Dr. Marilyn Flachman, and Kathleen's friend from Broomfield, Jill Nelson. 

 

All in all, a very valuable experience! 

 

COMMENTS ON THE

NATURALIZATION CEREMONY

FROM MARGE INNES AND

GERRY CUMMINS,

LWVCO VOTER SERVICES

(shared with permission)

 

From: Stephen Innes

Sent: Saturday, April 28, 2018 5:46 PM
To: Gerry
Subject: Re: Naturalization Ceremony

 

Gerry,

 

We had a wonderful afternoon at the Naturalization Ceremony.  They had 42 citizens.  We registered 13 and 3 on line.  Westminster had state, county, and city officials present and speaking.  There were 21 countries represented.  

 

Westminster had little potted plants to take home and plant.  We had red, white and blue necklaces and bracelets for the kids and they loved that!  Anyway, we had a great time!!!  I'm going to one of the citizen classes soon.  I want to see what they teach them.

 

Marge

 


2018 ANNUAL MARY CIANCIO MEMORIAL DISTINGUISHED SERVICE AWARD DINNER HELD ON APRIL 12TH

We had six members attend the Mary Ciancio Memorial Distinguished Service Award Dinner on Thursday April 12th, Cathy O’Grady-Melvin (previous award winner), Pat Lewis, Lisa Forbes, Marge Innes and Shirley Mrochek, and Senator Beth Martinez Humenik (who was seated separately).


This year the nominees were: Beverly Benzel, Reba & Gary Drotar, Loretta Garcia, Matthew Haviland, Sharon E. Maybee, C. Patricia McGinnis, Nancy McNally, Gloria Rudden, and Nicholas J. Stone.


Nancy McNally was awarded the Mary Ciancio Memorial Distinguished Service Award. Nancy has been part of the Westminster Citizen Police Alumni since 2003 and volunteers for many activities at the police department.  The alumni raised funds for items the police department needs, and it gives $3,000 a year for Santa Cops to supply gifts to needy children.  She is a trustee of the Westminster Historical Society and volunteers to help with all activities, including the Vintage Baseball Event.  She opens her house every Sunday to teach knitting and crochet at no charge.  She donates the crochet hats to chemo patients and one year teamed with friends to make 165 hats that went to a church group in Ethiopia.  She was named Small Business Person of the year by the Metro North Chamber of Commerce last year.  Nancy was also two-term mayor of Westminster.


This event was established in 1979 in honor of the late Mary Ciancio.  Mary advocated and volunteered for nearly 70 years on behalf of people with disabilities and health challenges.  Mary had a special place in her heart for people living with severe and persistent mental illness so much that she became known as the “Mother of Mental Health” in Adams County.

 

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The Voter is not published in June, July, or August.

 

Submit any questions, comments, concerns, program ideas or event requests to Marge Innes.  This is your League.  If you have a program idea, help us to make it happen.

 

Submit any suggestions or recommenda-tions for Voter articles to the Voter Editor.  

 

 

  For information or directions:

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Please contact any board member. (See Sidebar)

Need a ride to a meeting? Just ask!

MISSION STATEMENT

The League of Women Voters, a nonpartisan political organization, encourages informed and active participation in government and influences public policy through education and advocacy.

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 Become a Member
Dues are $60 per year, pro-rated after January 1st to September 15th. This covers the cost of our local League’s pledge to the National LWVUS and its publication “The Voter” issued 4 times a year plus the state League and its publication “Colorado Voter” (published quarterly). The financial support of our local league activities, including the newsletter and other publications, registration for workshops and special projects, comes from member donations above the $60.00 level. We appreciate any donations in excess of the dues. Thank you for your consideration. Dues levels are as follows:

Friend $60.00 (basic dues)

Sustaining $75.00
Advocate $100.00
.Checks may be made payable to LWV of Adams County and mailed to:

SHIRLEY MROCHEK, TREASURER, 10781 WANDA LANE, NORTHGLENN, CO 80234

Name __________________________________ _______________________________
email______________________________________Telephone_______________________________
Address __________________________________________________________________
Number and Street City Zip Code
I will need a ride to meetings: _________Yes __________No

lisa Forbes, Voter Editor
LWV of Adams County

Marge Innes – 1st Vice President  Acting Secretary/Voter Service Telephone Contact  303-427-3235 margeandsteve@msn.com
 
Pat Lewis – 2nd Vice President Membership 303-452-3030 pcmc1943@msn.com
 
Shirley Mrochek – Treasurer  303-452-0598 kmro1@msn.com
 
Cathy O’Grady-Melvin Public Relations and Health Care Issues 303-451-0375 cathyogrady13@gmail.com
 
Judy Nicholaisen E-mail and Telephone Contact 303-469-4002 judynich05@aol.com
 
Lisa Forbes Director at Large and Voter Editor 720-282-9449 info@lisaforbesinc.com

 

 

 

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Last Update 10/4//2018